Monday, July 6, 2015

Cool Facts About Animals images

A few nice facts about animals images I found:


Wiley the hound -- adopt in Virginia
facts about animals
Image by kathy doucette
UPDATE: Wiley has been adopted! Such a joyful dog.

We have many other lovely hounds waiting to be adopted.

Photo by Kathy Doucette, June 2009.

Bloggers -- please help promote our pets!

This is the wonderful Wiley! Wiley is about eight years old and has a very gentle soul. He gets along with everybody. He is neutered, his vet work is current and he has a microchip. He walks well on a leash and also travels great.

In fact, his microchip saved him from being euthanized recently. Ask us about that story when you come to meet Wiley!

Wiley is a happy wanderer and needs to be in a home with a securely fenced yard.

Contact the shelter for more info on Wiley, or to arrange to meet him. You can also stop by anytime during adoption hours, but you should probably call ahead to be sure he hasn't been sent out to an adoption event.

Adoption hours, shelter contact and directions: www.petfinder.com/shelters/VA123.html


Peter the Penguin
facts about animals
Image by roboM8
26/30 - Peter the Penguin, I love penguins, there so cute. Smelly Belly and Peter weren't looking at the camera today. Was it more butterflies, eagles, swans, or even minature thunderstorms. I think it was something else!? What do you think?
Smelly Belly's fact: Penguins walk faster than humans. Speedy penguins...

Sunday, July 5, 2015

What’s New at the National Zoo this Spring

Some cool animals that are extinct images:


What’s New at the National Zoo this Spring
animals that are extinct
Image by Smithsonian's National Zoo
Photo Credit: Gil Myers, Smithsonian's National Zoo

In this photo: scimitar-horned oryx

Visitors strolling through the Smithsonian’s National Zoo one of these beautiful spring days will see a variety of baby animals, some new faces and enjoy an entirely new food experience. Below are just a few of the new critters and experiences visitors can expect. More than 30 animal demonstrations take place every day in which visitors can encounter fascinating creatures and chat with keepers about the Zoo’s conservation efforts. To view the demonstration schedule, visit nationalzoo.si.edu/Visit/DailyPrograms/.

1.Baby Bird Bonanza Catch a glimpse of some of the world’s most endangered birds and their chicks up-close at the Bird House. A baby boom officially began March 7 when a brown kiwi hatched from his shell. The Zoo’s flock soon expanded to include a wattled crane, two Guam rails, three rheas and two sunbittern chicks. They’re growing fast, so bird watchers should plan to visit the Bird House in the next few weeks. Soon, the wattled crane chick will be six feet tall!

2.See Some Impressive Tortoises For the first time in its history, the Reptile Discovery Center will exhibit impressed tortoises. Not much is known about these reptiles, so Zoo biologists will study their growth and behavior. The two sub-adult males sport golden brown and black patterned shells, but this beauty has also made them vulnerable to extinction. Along with habitat loss, the pet trade contributes to the population decline of impressed tortoises in their native Thailand, Malaysia and Vietnam.

3.Zoo-perior Food An entirely new dining experience awaits visitors at the National Zoo thanks to its new food partner, Sodexo. Cafés and concession stands will serve a wide variety of authentic ethnic cuisines, as well as healthier versions of traditional favorites. What’s more, ingredients are local, seasonal and sustainable. The menus for six food service stations are available on the Zoo’s website.

4.New Neighbors at the Cheetah Conservation Station Two young scimitar-horned oryx named Sweeney and Omar are the newest residents at the Zoo’s African savanna exhibit. These large desert antelope sport horns that are several feet long and resemble a long, curved scimitar—a type of Arabian sword. The half-brothers were born at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va., last year. Native to northern Africa, scimitar-horned Oryx are considered extinct in the wild by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

5.The Inside Story For an in-depth perspective on why animals behave the way they do, stop by the Small Mammal House this May and check out its new exhibit: “The Inside Story.” Learn how anteaters eat without any teeth, how a Prevost squirrel nimbly jumps from branch to branch, and more. Artifacts and x-rays of animals’ skulls, muscles, and tails will show visitors how adaptations help animals survive in a changing world.

Visitors are encouraged to take public transportation to the National Zoo. Parking lots fill up by mid-morning and then free up early afternoon during spring and summer. Last admittance to the Zoo is 7 p.m. To reserve a parking space 48 hours in advance, call Friends of the National Zoo Guest Services at 202-633-4486 between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. Parking reservation fees of for FONZ members and for nonmembers apply.

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What’s New at the National Zoo this Spring
animals that are extinct
Image by Smithsonian's National Zoo
Photo Credit: Gil Myers, Smithsonian's National Zoo

In this photo: scimitar-horned oryx

Visitors strolling through the Smithsonian’s National Zoo one of these beautiful spring days will see a variety of baby animals, some new faces and enjoy an entirely new food experience. Below are just a few of the new critters and experiences visitors can expect. More than 30 animal demonstrations take place every day in which visitors can encounter fascinating creatures and chat with keepers about the Zoo’s conservation efforts. To view the demonstration schedule, visit nationalzoo.si.edu/Visit/DailyPrograms/.

1.Baby Bird Bonanza Catch a glimpse of some of the world’s most endangered birds and their chicks up-close at the Bird House. A baby boom officially began March 7 when a brown kiwi hatched from his shell. The Zoo’s flock soon expanded to include a wattled crane, two Guam rails, three rheas and two sunbittern chicks. They’re growing fast, so bird watchers should plan to visit the Bird House in the next few weeks. Soon, the wattled crane chick will be six feet tall!

2.See Some Impressive Tortoises For the first time in its history, the Reptile Discovery Center will exhibit impressed tortoises. Not much is known about these reptiles, so Zoo biologists will study their growth and behavior. The two sub-adult males sport golden brown and black patterned shells, but this beauty has also made them vulnerable to extinction. Along with habitat loss, the pet trade contributes to the population decline of impressed tortoises in their native Thailand, Malaysia and Vietnam.

3.Zoo-perior Food An entirely new dining experience awaits visitors at the National Zoo thanks to its new food partner, Sodexo. Cafés and concession stands will serve a wide variety of authentic ethnic cuisines, as well as healthier versions of traditional favorites. What’s more, ingredients are local, seasonal and sustainable. The menus for six food service stations are available on the Zoo’s website.

4.New Neighbors at the Cheetah Conservation Station Two young scimitar-horned oryx named Sweeney and Omar are the newest residents at the Zoo’s African savanna exhibit. These large desert antelope sport horns that are several feet long and resemble a long, curved scimitar—a type of Arabian sword. The half-brothers were born at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va., last year. Native to northern Africa, scimitar-horned Oryx are considered extinct in the wild by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature.

5.The Inside Story For an in-depth perspective on why animals behave the way they do, stop by the Small Mammal House this May and check out its new exhibit: “The Inside Story.” Learn how anteaters eat without any teeth, how a Prevost squirrel nimbly jumps from branch to branch, and more. Artifacts and x-rays of animals’ skulls, muscles, and tails will show visitors how adaptations help animals survive in a changing world.

Visitors are encouraged to take public transportation to the National Zoo. Parking lots fill up by mid-morning and then free up early afternoon during spring and summer. Last admittance to the Zoo is 7 p.m. To reserve a parking space 48 hours in advance, call Friends of the National Zoo Guest Services at 202-633-4486 between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. Parking reservation fees of for FONZ members and for nonmembers apply.

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Saturday, July 4, 2015

Nice Facts About Animals photos

A few nice facts about animals images I found:


Ong bầu Carpenter bee Xylocopa Xylocopineae
facts about animals
Image by Duy-Thuong
Tôi có một cái kẹp bằng cây tầm vông (kẹp để hái trái trên cây) do lâu dùng đến nên có 2 con ong bầu đục lổ và ở trong đó.
Ong bầu không có đàn, nó sống đơn lẻ, nó thường khoét gỗ và ở trong đó.
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Carpenter bees (the genus Xylocopa in the subfamily Xylocopinae) are large, hairy bees distributed worldwide. There are some 500 species of carpenter bee in 31 subgenera. Their name comes from the fact that nearly all species build their nests in burrows in dead wood, bamboo, or structural timbers (except those in the subgenus Proxylocopa, which nest in the ground). Members of the related tribe Ceratinini are sometimes referred to as "small carpenter bees".


Taxonomy The genus was described by French entomologist Pierre André Latreille in 1802. The name is derived from the Ancient Greek xylokopos/ξῦλοκὀπος "wood-cutter". Bumble bees live for a maximum of 5 days.

Characteristics
Carpenter bees have large compound eyes In several species, the females live alongside their own daughters or sisters, creating a sort of social group. They use wood bits to form partitions between the cells in the nest. A few species bore holes in wood dwellings. Since the tunnels are near the surface, structural damage is generally minor or nonexistent.

Carpenter bees can be important pollinators on open-faced flowers, even obligate pollinators on some, such as the Maypop (Passiflora incarnata), though many species are also known to "rob" nectar by slitting the sides of flowers with deep corollas.

In the United States, there are two eastern species, Xylocopa virginica, and Xylocopa micans, and three other species that are primarily western in distribution, Xylocopa varipuncta, Xylocopa tabaniformis orpifex and Xylocopa californica. X. virginica is by far the more widely distributed species. Some are often mistaken for a bumblebee species, as they can be similar in size and coloration, though most carpenter bees have a shiny abdomen, while in bumblebees the abdomen is completely clothed with dense hair. Males of some species have a white or yellow face, where the females do not; males also often have much larger eyes than the females, which relates to their mating behavior. Male bees are often seen hovering near nests, and will approach nearby animals. However, males are harmless since they do not have a stinger. Female carpenter bees are capable of stinging, but they are docile and rarely sting unless caught in the hand or otherwise directly provoked.

Many Old World carpenter bees have a special pouch-like structure on the inside of their first metasomal tergite called the acarinarium where certain species of mites (Dinogamasus spp.) reside as commensals. The exact nature of the relationship is not fully understood, though in other bees that carry mites, the mites are beneficial, feeding either on fungi in the nest, or on other, harmful mites.

Behavior
Carpenter bee nest in a tree trunk
Carpenter bee gallery in a split piece of 2X4 woodCarpenter bees are traditionally considered solitary bees, though some species have simple social nests in which mothers and daughters may cohabit. However, even solitary species tend to be gregarious, and often several will nest near each other. It has been occasionally reported that when females cohabit, there may be a division of labor between them, where one female may spend most of her time as a guard within the nest, motionless and near the entrance, while another female spends most of her time foraging for provisions.

Carpenter bees make nests by tunneling into wood, vibrating their bodies as they rasp their mandibles against the wood, each nest having a single entrance which may have many adjacent tunnels. The entrance is often a perfectly circular hole measuring about 16 millimetres (0.63 in) on the underside of a beam, bench, or tree limb. Carpenter bees do not eat wood. They discard the bits of wood, or re-use particles to build partitions between cells. The tunnel functions as a nursery for brood and storage for the pollen/nectar upon which the brood subsists. The provision masses of some species are among the most complex in shape of any group of bees; whereas most bees fill their brood cells with a soupy mass, and others form simple spheroidal pollen masses, Xylocopa form elongate and carefully sculpted masses that have several projections which keep the bulk of the mass from coming into contact with the cell walls, sometimes resembling an irregular caltrop. The eggs are very large relative to the size of the female, and are some of the largest eggs among all insects.

There are two very different mating systems that appear to be common in carpenter bees, and often this can be determined simply by examining specimens of the males of any given species. Species in which the males have large eyes are characterized by a mating system where the males either search for females by patrolling, or by hovering and waiting for passing females, whom they then pursue. In the other type of mating system, the males often have very small heads, but there is a large, hypertrophied glandular reservoir in the mesosoma, which releases pheromones into the airstream behind the male while it flies or hovers. The pheromone advertises the presence of the male to females


The Problem With Aquariums
facts about animals
Image by Little Lioness
I've always been a supporter of AZA-accredited zoos, but I draw the line when it comes to aquariums. Especially if those aquariums keep cetaceans such as whales, dolphins, or porpoises for show.

To put it bluntly, there is simply NO possible way to keep a happy dolphin in captivity. We've been trying to do so since the 1860s, with only minor advancements in recent years.

Thus far, absolutely no scientific evidence has shown that keeping such animals in captivity can contribute to conservation, firstly because they rarely breed in captivity, and secondly because captive-born whales and dolphins cannot be released into the wild.

Supporters still argue that we can learn a lot about wild dolphins by studying captive ones. But it's rare for captive dolphins to act in captivity as they would in the wild. This is because in the wild, many species of dolphin spend their entire day patrolling hundreds of miles of open ocean, interacting with entire family units and bonding by co-operative play and hunting behaviors. These behaviors are impossible to reproduce in captivity on account of one simple fact: We cannot re-create their natural habitats.

As a result of this, many whales and dolphins grow increasingly bored over time, and, like many zoo animals, will eventually take up repetitive habits known as stereotypes. Stereotyping among cetaceans differs from that of other zoo animals. While land animals like bears and big cats will pace, bob their heads, and gnaw incessantly to keep themselves from going insane, dolphins and whales have actually been known to resort to self-mutilation and even suicide.

Sea World and other 'show' parks claim that they keep their dolphins happy by teaching them to perform tricks for eager crowds. But the fact of the matter is, taking commands from hand signals several dozen times a week loses its appeal very quickly for these intelligent animals.

Unable to connect within their natural ocean habitats also makes social interactions between captive cetaceans tricky business. Physical interactions between captive whales and dolphins are rare, and the offspring usually die young. Those that survive have been known to develop odd physical traits such as bent dorsal fins as a direct result of growing up in inadequate conditions.

In conclusion, there is little (if any) justification for keeping such animals in captivity.
Please do these creatures a favor and REFUSE TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENTS WHICH KEEP THEM.


Snowy Owl Educator
facts about animals
Image by Douglas Brown
Alaska this time of year is not very (photographically) interesting. Fall is long gone now but we're not really into Winter yet. Everything is barren and not such a great situation for someone interested in nature photography.

So, I'm gonna post animals shots for a while. Most of them very current, like today's Snowy Owl shot from a program I went to yesterday at the Zoo about Snowy Owl and was able to get much closer than ever possible when they are in their cages at the Zoo.*** In fact, I've never gotten a good shot of this Snowy Owl in his cage, ever. The ones I've posted before where in the Wild or from the BirdTLC Rescue and Rehabilitation facility.

But I'll post some animal photographs from my recent trip to the Wildlife Conservation Center, a few from the Wild, and a very few from the Zoo.

When the Snow comes, I can branch out again and head for the woods with my trusty companion, Harry!

*** I hate even saying the word "cage" but the Anchorage Zoo is a rescue and rehabilitation Zoo. The animals here can not survive in the wild. This particular Snowy Owl has fine motor control issues with one wing which does not allow him to have that instantaneous and minute course change ability in flight which these Owls must have to catch prey from the air.

Thursday, July 2, 2015

Cool Animal Shelters images

Some cool animal shelters images:


Poster Outside HALO House
animal shelters
Image by Smitten with Kittens


Cat Winter Shelter
animal shelters
Image by joediev
"Managed Feral Cat Colony Winter shelters provided in cooperation with the Austin Humane Society / Town Lake Animal Shelter and Stray Cat Trap / Neuter / Return Program" Outside my office at Domain d5


More Painters!
animal shelters
Image by wabisabi2015
Many dogs from the first group of painters were adopted before the exhibit (Hooray!), so we needed more of them.

Nice About Endangered Animals photos

A few nice about endangered animals images I found:



Baby Boom at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
about endangered animals
Image by Smithsonian's National Zoo
Photo Credit: Chris Crowe

The onset of summer for animal care staff at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va., means patiently awaiting endangered-animal births, hand-raising youngsters and saying farewell to cubs that are ready to be matched with mates. This year, SCBI-Front Royal celebrated its first hatching of the year Jan. 31 with a kiwi chick. Many more species followed, namely clouded leopard cubs, maned wolf pups and a white-naped crane chick. All of these species—which range in International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List status from near threatened to endangered—are significant and represent great conservation successes.

SCBI geneticists have identified the white-naped crane chick that hatched April 14 as a male. The biological parents of the chick, Alex and Amanda, were unable to breed naturally because Amanda was hand-raised and is partially imprinted (socially bonded) with people. Because white-naped cranes are vulnerable to extinction—and because this pair is genetically valuable—SCBI scientists performed an artificial insemination. They then transferred the egg to the care another crane pair, Brenda and Eddie, who had successfully raised chicks before. The chick is doing well and is almost the same size as an adult.

Two male maned wolf pups born April 14 to 2-year-old female Vitani and 8-year-old male, Paul, received a clean bill of health at their first veterinary exam. They appear to be robust and healthy. Keepers have nicknamed the pups “Bold” and “Shy” for their distinctive personalities. Only 85 maned wolves are part of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ Species Survival Plan, and these pups account for 40 percent of successful maned wolf births in the United States this year. A leader in maned wolf conservation, SCBI has had 74 pups born there since 1975—more than any other institution.

Male clouded leopard cub Mingma and his sister, Kali, were transferred to their new home at the Nashville Zoo June 20. Mingma weighed about 9 pounds, and Kali weighed about 8 pounds at a pre-shipment exam. Born Feb. 6, the cubs will be paired with their future mates. Doing so drastically reduces the risk of aggression between these endangered cats when they reach sexual maturity. Clouded leopard infants have a 47 percent survival rate, which soars to 99 percent if the cats are hand-reared. Listed as vulnerable to extinction in the wild, SCBI has had more than 70 clouded leopards born there over the past 30 years and is a leader in conservation science initiatives to save the species.

Female North Island brown kiwi chick Manawa Ora hatched Jan. 31. Her name means “hope” in Maori. The IUCN considers the brown kiwi an endangered species due, in part, to predation by dogs, cats and stoats (members of the weasel family). The wild population of the brown kiwi is estimated at roughly 24,000, down from 60,000 in the 1980s. Kiwi in zoos are extremely rare. Only five zoos outside of New Zealand have successfully bred these unique birds, and the population is heavily skewed toward males. Manawa Ora will become a valuable breeder because her genes are not well-represented in the captive population. She will remain at SCBI-Front Royal until she reaches sexual maturity at 2-3 years of age.

The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute plays a key role in the Smithsonian's global efforts to understand and conserve species and train future generations of conservationists. Headquartered in Front Royal, Va., SCBI facilitates and promotes research programs based at Front Royal, the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., and at field research stations and training sites worldwide.

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Wednesday, July 1, 2015

somebody set them free

A few nice free animals images I found:


somebody set them free
free animals
Image by omnia_mutantur
paris - france - february 2013



Man Looking at a Animal Statue at Logan Square
free animals
Image by sameold2010
That's the Philadelphia Free Public Library to the left.

Sunday, June 28, 2015

Nice Animal Picture photos

A few nice animal picture images I found:


Horsing Around in Shinjuku Gyoen
animal picture
Image by jldmplnktt
Exif_JPEG_PICTURE



lynx on a fallen tree
animal picture
Image by Cloudtail
Another picture fom a lynx at Wildpark Pforzheim